Mist Mountain

Canmore
View Photos

Mist Mountain

Distance: 11.0km
Elevation: 1,245m
Time: 5-8h

Difficulty Rating:

User Ratings:
No ratings yet

Scrambling Mist Mountain takes you up the largest peak in the immediate area, which is a sure-fire guarantee for an awesome summit view! Not only that, but scramble route is a scenic and pleasant approach that can’t be beat.

Getting there

The common hikers route up Mist Mountain begins at a grassy pullout (currently no grass, just mud) on the north side of Highway 40, 13.0km south of Highwood Pass or 25.0km west of Highwood Junction.

About

When to do

July - September

Backcountry Campsites

No

Toilets

Several Day Use Areas Along Highway 40

Pets allowed

Yes - On Leash

Scarmbling Rating

Grade 1

Exposure

Mild

Family friendly

Yes

Route Signage

None

Crowd Levels

Low

Route Type

Out and back


Elevation


Detailed Description

At 3140m, Mist Mountain is the highest mountain east of Highwood Pass and thus offers outstanding views of the area. It is also a very easy scramble, requiring no more than stamina and a tolerance for scree.

The common hikers route entails following an overgrown logging road for 1.0km and crossing a flood damaged stream. On our return we ignored this logging road, instead continuing south on an excellent and obvious trail beginning where the old logging road intersects the trail starting up Mist Mountain. We reached the highway 600m east of the usual starting point and noted that the beginning of this trail was marked with a piece of flagging on a small aspen tree. It is a far superior option to the usual route and there is plenty of space to the side of the highway to park. There is also an odd paved pullout about 300m east of this point which could be an alternate parking point.

From this starting point the trail ascends north for 3.0km, first gently through forest and then more steeply up a grassy valley to a pass between “Nameless Ridge” to the east and a southern ridge of Mist Mountain to the west. From the pass, ascend the grassy bump to the left (west) and then follow a good trail along scree slopes towards the rocky bowl, south of Mist Mountain.

Shortly past where a stream materializes from the scree near the entrance to the rocky bowl begin ascending Mist Mountain. You have your choice of loose small scree, big mostly stable scree, or solid, grippy bedrock on which to ascend 500m. It’s tedious, but technically easy. If all goes well, you’ll arrive on top of the southeastern ridge of Mist Mountain. The summit ridge extends to the northwest and from this vantage looks impossibly steep, but at its steepest is no steeper than what you just ascended. Just choose your route carefully as similar scree qualities exist as did earlier on the ascent. Also note that the actual summit is not what appears to be the summit from this vantage, but is rather just a short distance further.

It is possible to descend the summit via scree slopes that begin to the southeast of the summit and deposit you at the back of the rocky bowl in which you started the final ascent. This route, however, was snow covered while we were there and thus we chose to descend the same way as we ascended, sticking as much as possible to the small loose scree to make the descent much faster and more fun.

Insider Hints

  • The entire Highwood Pass area, including the southern portion of Highway 40, is closed from December 1st to June 14th each year.

  • Highwood House is the closest place to stop for a snack after the hike.

Comments

To add rating to your comment you need to log In or sign up.

0 Comments

Similar adventures

East End of Rundle Route (EEOR)

Difficulty:
6.7km
855m
5-6h

Scrambling the East End of Rundle or EEOR is a popular scramble close to Canmore. It is often under-estimated, and…

Mount Howard

Difficulty:
20.1km
1052m
7-10h

The views from the summit of Mount Howard are as spectacular as any, but it is the long and wonderfully…

Grotto Mountain

Difficulty:
11.2km
1352m
7-10h

Scrambling up Grotto Mountain offers a commanding aerial view of Canmore and the Bow Valley. Often thought of as a…