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    Tonto National Forest

    Hikes in Tonto National Forest

    Region in Arizona, United States

    There are so many gorgeous trails in the Tonto National Forest, choosing which ones to explore first is no easy task. Thankfully, choosing the best hikes in this amazing part of the Grand Canyon State is easier than ever with our wide-ranging collection of route guides. From relaxed beginner-friendly strolls to epic mountain-scaling climbs, there’s something for every level in the Tonto National Forest. With scenery that oscillates from cacti-studded desert to lush pine forest, you’ll just want to keep hiking, and hiking, and hiking.

    The trails in the Tonto National Forest can be used by hikers, mountain bikers, horseback riders, families, those with dogs, and backpackers. With proximity to Phoenix in some parts of the forest, it’s a top destination for hikers in the city, but the more far-flung trails will speak to the lovers of the remote wilderness, too.

    15 Must-Do Hikes in the Tonto National Forest

    As you plan your adventures in the Tonto National Forest, start with these 15 hikes. Of course, we’ve got over 100 routes in this region that you can follow, so this is only the start! These hikes are some of our favorite in the forest and show off the unique desert beauty of this area, from saguaro-lined trails to hidden swimming holes.

    Since the Tonto National Forest is so big, we recommend taking a good look to track down all the trails in whatever part you’ll be visiting. Some corners are lushly forested, some are dry and cholla-filled, but all of them capture the unique, changing landscape of Arizona. Let’s get started!

    • Water Wheel Falls - Water Wheel Falls is a hike near Payson that has become increasingly popular because of its excellent swimming opportunities. The trail was named for an old water wheel you can see from the trailhead, and the route follows the East Verde River to a gorge used by cliff jumpers and a short waterfall into a wonderful swimming hole.
    • Wave Cave Trail - You probably didn’t think you could surf in Arizona, did you? The Wave Cave is a unique cave where a “wave” of rock protrudes out into the cave opening. It’s one of the many fascinating rock formations and caves that make Arizona’s landscape so fun to explore. The hike to the cave is moderate, with a few short, steep sections.
    • Box Canyon Trail - When the temperatures start to soar, you need a chilled-out afternoon in a refreshing swimming hole. The Box Canyon Trail is a quick 1.3 km hike that leads you down into a box canyon with a swimming hole in it. The red granite walls are gorgeous and the water feels perfect when the sun is shining.
    • Verde Hot Springs - The Verde Hot Springs hike takes you along an easy trail to a hot spring at an abandoned resort. Perched along the Verde River, the pools were constructed in the 1920s when this area was a tourist attraction. A fire in the 1960s destroyed the resort, but the foundation and pools survived. Abandoned ever since, the pools are open for public use and offer a unique spot to get a soak in.
    • Treasure Trail and Siphon Draw Loop - The Treasure Trail and Siphon Draw Loop is a 4.8 km hike with amazing desert scenery. This route takes you through a dramatic basin lined by low granite mountains, and you can also use the trail to climb The Flatiron. Even if you want to stay on the easier paths, this is a hike with incredible scenery. It offers a lot without being too difficult or demanding.
    • Horton Creek Trail - Horton Creek Trail is a 13.8 km popular hike enjoyed by everyone from families to solo hikers to those with dogs. The trail follows along Horton Creek, taking you past waterfalls, small pools, and through trees. This is a very relaxing hike, and despite the elevation gain and distance, it feels fairly gradual until a bigger climb at the end of the trail, which can be skipped in favor of an easier trip.
    • Butcher Jones Trail - Butcher Jones Trail leads you through the Sonoran Desert to the shores of Saguaro Lake and the Salt River. This is an absolute oasis in the middle of the desert and an excellent place to spot wildlife like bighorn sheep, javelinas, and bald eagles. If you’re exceptionally lucky, you could even spot the wild horses of the Lower Salt River while travelling through the area.
    • Bob Bear Trail - Bob Bear Trail (formerly known as Fossil Springs Trail) is one of the most popular day hikes in the Tonto National Forest. This trail leads you along a canyonside route with amazing views of the Verde Valley, down through a treed-in trek, and to Fossil Springs. These springs flow over a short waterfall into a swimming hole. It’s a beautiful site that’s ideal on hot, sunny days.
    • Picketpost Mountain Trail - Picketpost Mountain Trail is a 6.8 km hike that leads you up a dramatic, isolated butte. Previously used as a battleground in efforts by Geroge Stoneman to seize this land from the Yavapai, the butte is now an area for campers and hikers to appreciate Arizona’s rugged scenery. At the top, make sure you bring a little note or treat to place in the mailbox. You can also read the notes from previous hikers.
    • Bulldog Saddle and Pass Mountain - The Bulldog Saddle and Pass Mountain Trail Loop is a fun hike that starts right from the city limits of Apache Junction. The hike takes you all the way around Peak 3004 and beside Pass Mountain. The views are awesome and the hike will get your legs working without being overly strenuous. This is a good pick if you want to feel like you’re in the mountains without having to actually climb one.
    • Hawes Trail System Loop - The Hawes Trail System is a well-developed mountain biking and hiking route collection near the Salt River. This loop makes use of several trails in the system to put together a hike with awesome desert and river scenery. You can even check out an old mine shaft from the region’s past mining days.
    • Blue Wash Trail - Blue Wash Trail is a scenic 4.5 km just north of Phoenix. This route leads you through a wash to Camp Creek Falls. With rugged canyon scenery, a few viewpoints, and the flowing water to follow as you near the falls (depending on the time of year), this is an enjoyable hike for all skill levels. This trail is also popular with horseback riders.
    • Lone Mountain - Lone Mountain, also known as EJ Peak by locals, is a 2,800-foot mountain in the Usery Range just outside of Phoenix. The trail up the mountain and back is only 3.7 km roundtrip, making this one of the easier summits you can bag. From the top, enjoy a fantastic view of Pass Mountain, Brown’s Peaks, McDowell Peak, and the rest of the Goldfield and Usery Mountains in the distance.
    • Praying Hands to Slot Rock - Want to check out two of the coolest rock formations in the Tonto National Forest in one hike? The Praying Hands to Slot Rock hike is an awesome trek that shows off just how otherworldly the scenery of the Arizona desert can be. You’ll start at Praying Hands, a rock formation that--you guessed it--looks just like praying hands. You’ll then hike to Slot Rock, another neat formation with natural windows and narrow slots.
    • Massacre Falls - As the legends of the Superstition Wilderness say, a rich Mexican family came to this area to mine gold in the 1840s. Cornered and killed by the Apache, Massacre Falls and Massacre Falls Trail got their names from this bloody past. Don’t let the moniker deter you, though. This is a great waterfall hike with lots of pleasant scenery and not as much violence these days.

    Scroll down to see even more hiking trails in the Tonto National Forest.

    When is the Best Time to Hike in the Tonto National Forest

    The best time to hike in the Tonto National Forest depends on the part of the forest you’re in. If you’re closer to Phoenix or exploring lower elevation desert trails, you’ll want to avoid the scorching summer months. Visiting between mid-October and late May will keep you out of the brutal heat. Note that this region experiences a monsoon season in the summertime that can make hiking dangerous due to flash flooding. As a rule of thumb, raincheck your hike if a monsoon is on the way.

    If you’re in higher elevation areas, you’ll often be able to hike year-round. Some mountaintops get snow in the winter that can make hiking difficult, but for the most part, a light jacket should suffice to make your winter explorations in the forest viable. No matter where you are in the forest, the summer will likely still get very hot, so if you’re not used to the Arizona heat, we recommend avoiding July and August at least.

    Other Outdoor Activities in the Tonto National Forest

    While the trails are excellent, hiking is certainly not the only way to explore the Tonto National Forest! There’s lots that can be done outside out here.

    Adventurers on two wheels can take advantage of the many mountain bike and dirt bike paths. Those with four-legged friends can explore horse and dog-friendly trails. Campers can set up their tents in sites both backcountry and front-country. Photographers can capture the rugged beauty of the desert and the unique wildlife that calls it home, and those who love off-roading will find exciting trails to cruise.

    How to Plan a Trip to the Tonto National Forest

    The Tonto National Forest is an easy enough region to plan a trip to, with only a bit of advance planning necessary to make sure your trip goes off without a hitch.

    Since the forest is so large, you’ll want to pick a home base or two. The Phoenix area enjoys easy access to a large part of the forest, particularly the northern and northeastern suburbs. If you want to stay out of the city, there are lots of routes accessible from Payson, Goldfield, Roosevelt, and other small towns northeast of Phoenix. State parks and towns within the Tonto National Forest often offer camping opportunities. If you’ll be booking campsites in the busy season (generally April-May and October-November), book as soon as you know your plans to ensure you get the spots you need.

    Most of the trails in the Tonto National Forest require a pass. Check with the USDA to see what kind of pass best suits your travel plans. Day passes can be purchased at many gas stations throughout the forest.

    Arizona Adventure Tours

    From deserts to epic canyons and from red rock mountains to creek-lined forests, Arizona’s got some of the most impressive and diverse scenery in the United States. Want to see it with the help of an expert guide or take a self-guided tour? Check out our adventure tours in Arizona.

    Frequently Asked Questions About the Tonto National Forest

    Is the Tonto National Forest worth visiting?

    The Tonto National Forest is definitely worth it, especially for those who want to hike, bike, or otherwise explore somewhere that feels rugged and off the beaten path. With a diverse range of scenery to see, you can appreciate the desert beauty near Phoenix or head up into the mountains to check out grand forests.

    What is the best month to visit the Tonto National Forest?

    We like to visit the forest in the spring (April and May) when the wildflowers are starting to bloom and the weather isn’t too hot yet.

    Why is it called the Tonto National Forest?

    The forest contains the Tonto Basin, which is where the name came from.

    Can you have a fire in the Tonto National Forest?

    This area is extremely prone to wildfires, so many campsites restrict fire activity. Check with your specific destinations and don’t start any fires unless you can confirm they’re permitted.

    Can you camp anywhere in the Tonto National Forest?

    While you can’t quite camp anywhere, there are lots of camping areas in the forest you can take advantage of.

    Explore other great hiking regions in the United States

    Or check out our full range of tour destinations in the United States.

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    Best Hikes in Tonto National Forest

    Showing 81 to 100 of 111
      Open details for Y Bar and Barnhardt Trail Loop

      Y Bar and Barnhardt Trail Loop

      Hard
      24.9 km
      928 m
      7-10h

      The Y Bar and Barnhardt Trail Loop is a 25.3 km loop hike in the Tonto National Forest. This route can be used as a longer day trip or you can take advantage of the camping sites along the way to backpack it. One side of this loop is very rocky, so sturdy boots are a must. While it’s a bit of a longer trek, the elevation gain is nicely spread out, making it a less demanding route than you might think. Expect moderate traffic.

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      Open details for Cypress-Stewart Ridge Extended Loop

      Cypress-Stewart Ridge Extended Loop

      Moderate
      8.4 km
      161 m
      2-2.5h

      The Cypress-Stewart Ridge Extended Loop is a 8.4 km adventure near Payson with divers,e changing scenery. With threes, shrubs, boulders, and lots of wildlife, the views will make you smile. This route is a bit rocky, so we recommend good boots. Also, it’s easy to lose this trail, so a downloaded map will be an important part of your preparation. Expect moderate traffic on this hike.

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      Open details for Highline and Pine Loop

      Highline and Pine Loop

      Very Easy
      2.6 km
      58 m
      0.5-1h

      The Highline and Pine Loop is a quick hike near Pine, Arizona. This route is moderately trafficked and it’s favored by locals for its super easy terrain and nice views. Grandparents, kids, beginners, and almost everyone else can hike this little loop together. Dogs are also welcome on this route as long as they’re kept on leash. There are also connecting trails on the north side of the loop that can be used if you want to extend your adventure a little bit.

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      Open details for Triple Arch Trail

      Triple Arch Trail

      Hard
      14.6 km
      442 m
      4-5.5h

      If you’re after classic Arizona desert scenery, the Triple Arch trail is such a treat. This route takes you through 14.5 km of beautiful desert dotted with massive saguaros to three stone arches in the towering rocks. Even if you can’t do all 14.5 km, you can still appreciate the scenery. This route is a bit of a hidden gem, so you likely won’t be sharing the route with many other hikers.

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      Open details for Alamo Canyon via Picketpost and Arizona Trail

      Alamo Canyon via Picketpost and Arizona Trail

      Moderate
      8.4 km
      229 m
      2-3h

      Alamo Canyon via Picketpost and Arizona Trail is a 8.4 km out and back hike that leads you through a canyon next to Picketpost Mountain in Tonto National Forest. Previously used as a battleground in efforts by Geroge Stoneman to seize this land from the Yavapai, Picketpost is now an area for campers and hikers to appreciate Arizona’s rugged scenery. This route is quite relaxed and good for most skill levels.

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      Open details for Jacob’s Crosscut and Prospector’s Loop

      Jacob’s Crosscut and Prospector’s Loop

      Moderate
      8.7 km
      301 m
      2.5-3.5h

      The Jacob’s Crosscut and Prospector’s Loop is a 8.7 km hike near Goldfield, Arizona. The scenery is lovely and you can lengthen this hike using the well-developed network of trails nearby. This route takes you to the Praying Hands formation. Most skill levels will be capable of completing this route. As with most hikes in the Phoenix area, you won’t want to attempt this adventure in the scorching summer months. Bring lots of water and slap on some sunscreen before heading out on the trail.

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      Open details for Mount Peeley Trail

      Mount Peeley Trail

      Moderate
      8.2 km
      443 m
      2.5-3.5h

      Mount Peeley Trail is a 8.0 km out and back trail near Payson that leads you up a mountain for awesome views of the range around you. This summit is fairly easy to reach as far as mountaintops go, and it doesn’t get overly busy. We do recommend coming armed with a GPS route to help you get right to the top, though. Expect moderate traffic on this hike.

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      Open details for Granite and Hawes Trail

      Granite and Hawes Trail

      Hard
      14.2 km
      417 m
      3.5-5h

      The Hawes Trail System is a well-developed mountain biking and hiking route collection near the Salt River in the Tonto National Forest. The Granite and Hawes Trail route makes use of two trails in the system to put together a hike with awesome desert and river scenery. This trail system is mostly used by mountain bikers, so you’ll need to share the trail. Bring more water than you think you’ll need and avoid this trail in the summertime or heat of the day.

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      Open details for Massacre Grounds Loop

      Massacre Grounds Loop

      Moderate
      8.0 km
      216 m
      2-3h

      The Massacre Grounds Loop leads you through an area once defined by Arizona’s gold rush. While its storied boom and bust past is fascinating, it draws hikers for its natural beauty above all else. With the Superstition Mountains spread before you on this route, you’ll be able to appreciate Arizona’s desert scenery as it climbs towards the base of the mountains ahead. This route is family-friendly and dog-friendly (leashed). It can get very hot out here, so take advantage of the fountains at the trailhead and fill up your bottles before setting out.

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      Open details for Gold Ridge Trail

      Gold Ridge Trail

      Hard
      19.0 km
      947 m
      6-8.5h

      The Gold Ridge Trail is a bit of a hidden gem. This route in the Tonto National Forest near Payson is almost 19.3 km long and rated as hard. For that work, you’ll find an awesome view of the surrounding mountains from the top. For a remote trail, it’s quite well-maintained and well-signed, making the hike quite enjoyable. There are also dispersed campsites along the trail if you want to make a multi-day trip out of the trail. Bring lots of water and prepare for a fantastic day out!

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      Open details for Willow Springs Lollipop

      Willow Springs Lollipop

      Moderate
      10.9 km
      236 m
      2.5-3.5h

      The Willow Springs Lollipop is a 10.8 km loop hike in the Tonto National Forest that can be reached quickly from the upper northeast reaches of the Mesa area. This hike offers stellar views of towering saguaros and red rock mountains. It does require some routefinding and a GPS track is essential, but it’s worth the small bit of preparation required. Bring lots of water on this route.

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      Open details for Oak Spring Trail

      Oak Spring Trail

      Moderate
      12.1 km
      324 m
      3-4.5h

      The Oak Spring Trail is a 12.1 km loop hike in the Tonto National Forest that can be reached quickly from Pine. This hike offers pleasant views of the rolling forest hills and the chance to see local wildlife. You may want a GPS route to help you find your way if you’ve not explored this trail before, and good boots and poles can help in areas of loose rock. Bring lots of water on this route.

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      Open details for Peach Orchard Trail

      Peach Orchard Trail

      Easy
      4.3 km
      153 m
      1-1.5h

      The Peach Orchard Trail is a 4.3 km loop trail in Payson that offers the chance to see wildlife and to enjoy the forest on a well-marked trail. This loop follows an old ATV track so it’s very wide and easy to navigate. You will need to deal with one big, steep, loose section going either uphill or downhill, which isn’t the best choice for very young kids or elderly hikers. Expect moderate traffic on this route.

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      Open details for Wolverine Pass Hike

      Wolverine Pass Hike

      Easy
      10.5 km
      176 m
      2.5-3.5h

      Wolverine Pass is a good hike for days when you want a real adventure. The views are great and it’s accessible right from the northern end of Apache Junction. That being said, it’s more of an old ATV route that wasn’t designed for hikers, so the signage is poor, the trail is sandy and travels through a wash most of the way, and it’s easy to get lost. With a GPS route to follow and some gumption, you can make a fun adventure out of this trail.

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      Open details for Willow Springs Basin Tank via Bulldog Canyon

      Willow Springs Basin Tank via Bulldog Canyon

      Moderate
      9.7 km
      237 m
      2.5-3.5h

      The Willow Springs Basin Tank via Bulldog Canyon is a 9.7 km loop hike in the Tonto National Forest that can be reached quickly from the upper northeast reaches of the Mesa area. This hike offers stellar scenes of towering saguaros and red rock canyon views. It does require some routefinding and a GPS track is helpful, but it’s worth the small bit of preparation required. Bring lots of water on this route.

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      Open details for Phon D Sutton Peak Loop

      Phon D Sutton Peak Loop

      Easy
      6.8 km
      124 m
      1.5-2h

      The Phon D Sutton Peak Loop is a 6.8 km easy hike near Apache Junction. This hike always offers wide-open desert scenery and the chance to spot snakes, quail, and Gila monsters, but in September, it can be so awash with butterflies that you won’t believe your eyes! It also doesn’t get very much traffic, so you might have the place to yourself. Bring lots of water and consider a GPS route for this hike.

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      Open details for 200 Trail

      200 Trail

      Easy
      4.2 km
      94 m
      1-1.5h

      200 Trail is a 4.2 km hike near Payson that is rated as easy, but it does still require a bit of an intrepid spirit. This hike has great views of Payson and the surrounding area, but the route is extremely hard to follow and there are tons of spur trails to lead you astray. It’s alright, though, since exploration is part of what makes this area so rewarding. Bring a GPS track and be willing to adventure a bit on this one.

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      Open details for Highline Trail #31

      Highline Trail #31

      Moderate
      12.4 km
      153 m
      2.5-3.5h

      The Highline Trail #31 is a 12.4 kmpoint-to-point hike in the Tonto National Forest that is rated as moderate. This route can be hiked in part or full as a day hike or you can use it as part of a backpacking trip. The route follows the base of a mesa that has numerous campsites atop it. Expect light traffic on this trail.

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      Open details for Bulldog Canyon Short Hike

      Bulldog Canyon Short Hike

      Moderate
      3.9 km
      82 m
      1-1.5h

      The Bulldog Canyon short hike is a smaller part of a longer canyon trail that starts right from the city limits of Apache Junction, Arizona. If the entire canyon is too much for you, choose this quicker out and back trip to still get some of the views without needing to work as hard. This route is shared by vehicle and horse traffic, so hike carefully and share the trail.

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      Open details for Little Saddle Mountain Trail

      Little Saddle Mountain Trail

      Moderate
      13.0 km
      478 m
      3.5-5h

      Little Saddle Mountain is an 12.9 km hike in the Tonto National Forest between the Phoenix area and Payson. It delivers some of the same views as Saddle Mountain without being as long or strenuous. This hike is at its best in the spring when everything is blooming! Expect light traffic on this route and come with lots of water.

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