Blackdown Walk

Difficulty
This reflects the 10Adventures difficulty rating for each route. We aim to keep ratings consistent across regions.
Moderate
Duration
This reflects the estimated time the majority of users will take on this trail. If you are slower, add time to the top-end figure. If you are fast, then you may complete this route faster than this time range.
2-2.5h
Distance
This reflects the return distance of this route as measured by the GPS file.
6.1 km
Elevation
This reflects the total elevation gained throughout this route as measured by the GPS file. This includes all ascents and descents, and is higher than what is quoted in most route guides, which simply measure the distance between the starting-point and high-point of the route.
273 m
User Ratings
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Directions to Trailhead
Blackdown Walk

The Blackdown Walk follows a stunning path that showcases the beauty of the English countryside in the spring. Wander through fields draped with bluebells and purple bilberries and take in the sights from the top of the hillside of West Sussex sitting below.

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Route Description for Blackdown Walk

Some areas of the Blackdown walk are quite muddy most times of the year due to the shade they sit in and the dips in the path. Make sure to wear appropriate footwear and take care with your dog if you bring one, as cows are seen at different times of the year grazing in the meadows.

This walk takes you through gorgeous meadows that are full of wildflowers in the spring and summer months, and part of the path sits on top of West Sussex, casting stunning views of the city below. This is a great choice if you are looking for a bit of a workout, as the path undulates throughout.

Beginning at the Haslemere rail station, follow the path until you reach the woodlands. You will arrive at a “T” junction, head left and head back into the woodlands. As you continue, you will come across a kissing gate among the grassy field, go through this, and you will reach open meadows. Continuing from here, you will pass through areas blanketed with purple bilberries and bluebells.

You will then come across a pool, which is the only source of water along this path, and then take the small and narrow path that looks as if it is for herding sheep. Follow this path through the trees for some time.

Continue following the path, and you will come across the main highlight of the walk, Blackdown. This is the highest hill in all of Sussex and the South Downs National Park. When you are finished taking in these beautiful views, continue to loop around the path back to where you began at the Haslemere rail station.

Insider Hints for Blackdown Walk

  • For a longer walk, begin at the Haslemere rail station, however, if you are looking for a shorter walk, begin at the car park at the end of Tennyson’s Lane.
  • Wear appropriate footwear as this walk can get muddy
  • Head to Guido’s craft pizza for a bite after your walk
  • If you want to spend more time in this area, the Noah’s Ark Inn has beautiful rooms

Getting to the Blackdown Walk Trailhead

To get to the Blackdown Walk from the Red Beeches Fishery, head South on Fernden Lane, and after 0.6 km, turn left. In 0.3 km, you will arrive at your destination.

Route Information

  • When to do

    Year round access

  • Backcountry Campsites

    No

  • Pets allowed

    Yes - On Leash

  • Family friendly

    No

  • Route Signage

    Average

  • Crowd Levels

    Moderate

  • Route Type

    Circuit

Blackdown Walk Elevation Graph

Weather Forecast

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Blackdown Walk Reviews

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