This vast country has an abundance of wilderness – start planning your next trip now!

“Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees,” wrote Environmentalist John Muir. Muir, who died in 1914, was perhaps America’s first environmental activist. The Scottish son of a clergyman, Muir believed in nature’s capacity to revitalize the human spirit and lobbied for the first national parks so ordinary people could reconnect with the wild. In today’s increasingly over-scheduled, screen-based world, Muir’s vision has never seemed more prophetic. Here are ten great places to rediscover the importance of nature.

ALASKA: Kesugi Ridge in Denali State Park
Denali Mountain and Wonder Lake at sunrise
Denali Mountain and Wonder Lake at sunrise

The Kesugi Ridge trail offers days of stunning panoramas of the Alaska Mountains including Denali (also known as Mount McKinley), America’s tallest mountain. The hike can be accessed at several points with the longest route roughly 57.9km. It is important to research your route because some access points may be closed due to flooding or an excessive number of bears. Which brings up another point, bear spray is a must. Because this trail is in Alaska, timing is important. This a trail best hiked during the summer and fall – late August and September are considered fall. The trail itself is easy to follow, although fog can be an issue so a compass is recommended. In good weather the views are unobstructed for days.

CALIFORNIA: The John Muir Trail
Nevada Falls along John Muir Trail, Yosemite National Park, California
Nevada Falls along John Muir Trail, Yosemite National Park, California

Named after the naturalist and founder of the Sierra Club, the iconic John Muir Trail features 339.6km of wilderness in California’s High Sierras, with much of the trail above 3048m – the highest point is just under 4420m. The trail passes through three national parks: Yosemite, Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks. The required permit can be obtained from the national park or national forest where you begin. Most people hike the trail from July through September, although snow may linger in the higher passes into August. A heavy snowpack, icy slopes and swollen streams are issues earlier in the season. Because bears are plentiful in some areas, storing food in bear-proof containers is recommended.
If you don’t want to do the whole thing, check out 10Adventures Yosemite region

WYOMING: Teton Crest Trail
Teton Crest Trail in Grand Teton National Park
Teton Crest Trail in Grand Teton National Park

From Phillips Pass to String Lake in Grand Teton National Park, the Teton Crest Trail is 64.4km of mesmerizing vistas. There are several access points. For the longest hike, start on the Phillips Pass trailhead from Teton Pass and follow the trail north to String Lake. The trail crosses Death Canyon Shelf and goes through Mount Meek Pass and Hurricane Pass and across the high alpine meadows of Alaska Basin. There is plentiful wildlife viewing, wild flower meadows and the previously mentioned spectacular views. A permit is required and because this is bear country, bear spray is a necessity. This is a strenuous hike with most of the trail over 2438m in elevation and the highest point over 3231m.
10Adventures covers the best hikes in the Tetons as well.

MAINE: Part of the Appalachian Trail
Appalachian Trail in Maine
Appalachian Trail in Maine

Maine’s 160.9km Wilderness is the longest part of the Appalachian Trail that never crosses a paved road. It begins at Monson, Maine, and ends at the northern terminus of the trail at Katahdin Mountain in Baxter State Park. Famous for its isolation, the 160.9km Wilderness can also be dangerous for non-expert hikers and a downright grind in spots. For those looking for a less arduous adventure, the first 48.3km offers a great hike through rugged but beautiful terrain with 70 percent fewer miles. Highlights include Lower Wilson Falls, the biggest waterfall on the Appalachian Trail, clear running streams and plenty of panoramic vistas from rocky mountaintops. Most people finish this hike in three days.

NEW HAMPSHIRE: Pemi (Pemigewasset Wilderness) Loop
Scenic autumn view of Profile Lake in New Hampshire
Scenic autumn view of Profile Lake in New Hampshire

The Pemi Loop is 50.7km of intense hiking – more than 2743m in elevation gain – with eight 1219m-plus peaks encircling the western half of New Hampshire’s Pemigewasset Wilderness. Featuring rugged terrain and spectacular vistas, this trip is best done in two or three days. Each of the peaks offers panoramic vistas and four additional 1219m summits can be reached via short day hikes. While the rewards are high, the demands are also, so only embark on this trail if you are sure your knees are up to it. Because significant sections are exposed, it is also important be prepared for the White Mountain’s notoriously variable weather conditions. Bears are also found in the Pemigewasset Wilderness, so carrying bear spray is a very good idea.

UTAH: The Highline Trail in Utah’s Uinta Mountains
Sunrise in the Uinta Mountains, Utah
Sunrise in the Uinta Mountains, Utah

If you are looking for a trail less traveled, the Highline Trail through Utah’s Uinta Mountains is worth your consideration. Roughly 120.7km through challenging terrain, most of which is around 3353m in elevation with the highest point about 3840m, this trail can be difficult and above all remote, so make sure you are well prepared for a wilderness experience largely above the tree line. That said, the Highline Trail is justifiably revered by hikers and if you enjoy having long stretches of trail to yourself, serene lakes, gorgeous views of high mountains, pine forests and lots of wildlife, put this trail on your list.

Check out our favourite day hikes in the Uintas.

WASHINGTON STATE: Mount Rainier National Park’s Wonderland Trail
Early fall colors on the misty Wonderland Trail in Mount Rainier National Park
Early fall colors on the misty Wonderland Trail in Mount Rainier National Park

Encircling Mount Rainier, the Wonderland Trail is about 149.7km long and is considered a strenuous trail with more than 6706m of cumulative elevation gain. Most people complete the trail in 10 to 14 days. With almost every section of the trail ascending or descending, the environment and even the micro-climate is constantly changing. Hikers will see glaciers, cascading waterfalls, subalpine meadows, lakes, canyons and stands of temperate rain forests. There are several river crossings, including two suspension bridges and some primitive log bridges. During the most popular hiking season in late summer, the weather is more likely to be dry and sunny but during the spring, as well as the first half or so of summer, rain, snow and swollen rivers can create hazards. Camping is allowed in designated camps only and permits are required.

COLORADO: The Four Pass Loop, in Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness Area
Reflection of Snow capped Maroon Bells in fall, at sunrise
Reflection of Snow capped Maroon Bells in fall, at sunrise

The Four Pass Loop through the Maroon Bells Mountains offers world class scenery including rugged mountain peaks, beautiful wildflowers in alpine meadows and pristine mountain lakes. Normally this loop takes three or four days and hikers will be challenged by four mountain passes, each over 3658m and the highest – West Maroon Pass – 3810m. Because of the elevation, it is probably best to plan your trip for late summer or early fall. Earlier in the season, snow melt creates swift running rivers. Overnight hikers are also required to use approved bear food storage containers. Free permits must be obtained at the trailhead.

Check out our favourite day hikes around Aspen.

CALIFORNIA: The Lost Coast Trail – North (40.2km)
Lost Coast of Northern California
Lost Coast of Northern California

Named for its tendency to vanish at high tide, and the scarcity of roads in the area, the northern section of the Lost Coast Trail passes through a slice of California’s coast so rugged that it literally drove the Pacific Coast Highway inland. Here, the mountains of the King Range meet the ocean and the trail winds through hidden beaches and up rugged highlands to soaring vistas above the Pacific Ocean. The scenery is stunning, but because much of the trail is beach, which literally disappears twice a day, it is important to study the tides and plan accordingly. Bear spray is also required and because the rainfall amounts can reach more than 2.5m a year, it is best to plan for a deluge, although precipitation in July and August is much less than during the winter months.

VERMONT: Long Trail
A beautiful fall landscape as seen from the Long Trail in the Brandon Gap of Vermont
A beautiful fall landscape as seen from the Long Trail in the Brandon Gap of Vermont

Stretching 434.5km from the Massachusetts border to Canada, the Long Trail, which travels along the spine of Vermont’s Green Mountains is this country’s oldest long-distance hiking path, conceived in 1909 and finally completed in 1930. Offering more backcountry than wilderness, the trail climbs rugged peaks and passes pristine woodland ponds, hardwood forests, alpine sedge and swift-flowing streams. In addition to the central footpath, there are 297.7km of side trails and roughly 70 backcountry campsites. A thru hike will take 20 to 30 days, but there is plenty of opportunity for section hiking. As with any hike involving exposed terrain, take appropriate precautions during inclement weather, and also be aware that this trail can be muddy in sections and bring plenty of extra socks.